1 Peter 13-12

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Pastor
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 3:03 am

1 Peter 13-12

Post by Pastor » Thu May 11, 2017 6:20 pm

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?s ... ersion=ESV

"Chosen/Elect" was how Peter described his audience immediately in vs1. This was intended to encourage readers who were facing persecution and would see their difficulties only increase in the days and years ahead. How does Peter continue with that theme in these verses?

When you are overloaded and overwhelmed have you ever considered praising God as a helpful remedy?
How could doing so turn things around for you?
What could you praise God for this very moment?
Does Peter offer items in these verses that you could add to your list?
How could the items in these verses give you a different perspective on your difficulties...and what lies beyond them?

CBOzias
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2017 5:11 pm

Re: 1 Peter 13-12

Post by CBOzias » Mon May 15, 2017 4:32 pm

Jan & I use this scripture every morning that we do our devotional together: "Blessed be God the father of our Lord Jesus Christ. By his great mercy we have been born anew to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead." Then we immediately pray with thanksgiving for each new day in our lives. What a blessing!

OAKPROA
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2017 1:59 am

Re: 1 Peter 13-12

Post by OAKPROA » Wed May 17, 2017 4:33 am

1 Peter 1:1-11 referred to SUFFERRING and now the theme of 1 Peter 1:12-20 indicates the blessing that follows.
Romans 6:17-18 But thanks be to God that, though you once were slaves to sin, you wholeheartedly obeyed the form of teaching to which you were committed. You have been set free from sin and have become slaves to righteousness.
St. Paul along with St.Peter (vs 19 above), repeatedly refers to this theological progress (i.e.fullness of time) by this blessing
1) Christ died and rose from the dead, we die and we will rise again also In Christ
2) We were slaves to sin, and now slaves to God
3) We are now new creations “in Christ”, capable of doing “GOOD WORKS” via the Holy Spirit.
Harry

awkratzke
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2017 12:13 am

Re: 1 Peter 13-12

Post by awkratzke » Fri May 26, 2017 9:55 pm

1 Peter1: 6-7 are verses that tell us that suffering is a test of faith.
No one escapes trials. See. e.g. Acts 14:22 (KJV) ”_____ and that
we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God”
and Job 5:7 (KJV) “Yet man is born unto trouble, as the sparks
fly upward.” See also the article, “You will have trouble” in the May
issue of Lutheran Witness.
My wife, Ruth, was taken to glory last November. She and I had
almost six years of study and meditation on Scriptural answers to her
late-in-life (Ruth was ninety years old when she died) trial.
Ruth had what the medical profession calls ‘left side neglect’ following
a massive stroke She had no use of her left side. With no left hand, she
had to adjust to playing the piano with only the right hand. She rearranged
music ‘on the fly,’ as she was playing. Before her stroke, Ruth had been
playing with a group from a local Lutheran church that conducted church
services in the area care centers. After a period of therapy, she resumed
the practice and continued playing until our move to Edmonds. Also, her
CD of hymns is used by volunteers at nursing homes, whose residents are
surely experiencing trials. She frequently said, “God isn’t through with me, yet.”
In his introduction to the verses from 1 Peter, Pastor M. asked whether
offering praise to God in the face of adversity might be a response to one’s
being overwhelmed by events. Ruth played at every opportunity and was
happiest then, offering her psalm of praise. Yes, praising God is a panacea
for all kinds of trials.
While Ruth was still alive I wrote a piece on our meditations on various
passages using the book, “Color of the Night” as a framework and backdrop.
My writing is too long for inclusion here but any interested reader can obtain
a copy by requesting one by e-mail. My address is awkratzke@aol.com
I’ll send a copy as an e-mail attachment. I offer these few pages not to strike
a “woe is me” posture nor to elicit sympathy from readers but rather in the
hope that our experience might be of some benefit to others facing difficult trials.

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BenBauer
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 7:58 am
Location: Duvall, WA

Re: 1 Peter 13-12

Post by BenBauer » Tue May 30, 2017 4:01 pm

awkratzke wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:55 pm
Before her stroke, Ruth had been playing with a group from a local Lutheran church that conducted church
services in the area care centers. After a period of therapy, she resumed
the practice and continued playing until our move to Edmonds. Also, her
CD of hymns is used by volunteers at nursing homes, whose residents are
surely experiencing trials. She frequently said, “God isn’t through with me, yet.”
This is such an amazing story that just proves what rejoicing through trials can produce. Your late wife could have simply given up, could have said that without the use of her left side her piano playing was over. But through her perseverance and rejoicing she continued to play and continued to touch people's hearts with her playing.

"God isn't through with me, yet" is such a great testament for why we are here on Earth and why, even when sin surrounds us and we are suffering, we strive to celebrate that "God isn't through with me"... I still have more to do.

Thanks for sharing this story.

Nick Neils
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 4:36 am

Re: 1 Peter 13-12

Post by Nick Neils » Wed Jul 05, 2017 4:40 am

awkratzke wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:55 pm
1 Peter1: 6-7 are verses that tell us that suffering is a test of faith.
No one escapes trials. See. e.g. Acts 14:22 (KJV) ”_____ and that
we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God”
and Job 5:7 (KJV) “Yet man is born unto trouble, as the sparks
fly upward.” See also the article, “You will have trouble” in the May
issue of Lutheran Witness.
My wife, Ruth, was taken to glory last November. She and I had
almost six years of study and meditation on Scriptural answers to her
late-in-life (Ruth was ninety years old when she died) trial.
Ruth had what the medical profession calls ‘left side neglect’ following
a massive stroke She had no use of her left side. With no left hand, she
had to adjust to playing the piano with only the right hand. She rearranged
music ‘on the fly,’ as she was playing. Before her stroke, Ruth had been
playing with a group from a local Lutheran church that conducted church
services in the area care centers. After a period of therapy, she resumed
the practice and continued playing until our move to Edmonds. Also, her
CD of hymns is used by volunteers at nursing homes, whose residents are
surely experiencing trials. She frequently said, “God isn’t through with me, yet.”
In his introduction to the verses from 1 Peter, Pastor M. asked whether
offering praise to God in the face of adversity might be a response to one’s
being overwhelmed by events. Ruth played at every opportunity and was
happiest then, offering her psalm of praise. Yes, praising God is a panacea
for all kinds of trials.
While Ruth was still alive I wrote a piece on our meditations on various
passages using the book, “Color of the Night” as a framework and backdrop.
My writing is too long for inclusion here but any interested reader can obtain
a copy by requesting one by e-mail. My address is awkratzke@aol.com
I’ll send a copy as an e-mail attachment. I offer these few pages not to strike
a “woe is me” posture nor to elicit sympathy from readers but rather in the
hope that our experience might be of some benefit to others facing difficult trials.
Thanks for sharing the story.
Let the lord god hear all your prayers

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